Tag Archives: affordable horse supplements

Digestive Support II – Yeast and the Farting Horse

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When you look at the ingredient list of many feeds and digestive supplements, you will see some sort of yeast inclusion.  Why is this?  How beneficial is it, and when do you need it?

The digestive tract is full of components and organisms that help the horse break down, digest, and uptake nutrients.  Yeast is a microscopic fungus that grows on plant sugars and certain cultures can enhance the activity of good (beneficial) hind-gut activity in your horse.  Not to be mistaken for curing hind gut issues, just enhancing proper activity.

Yeasts are high in B-Complex vitamins, and food yeasts are 40-55% protein and contain all the essential amino acids for complete protein utilization. Brewer’s yeast and distiller’s grains can be incorporated into equine diets as a means of increasing protein values.

Yeast improves utilization of feed and inhibition of pathogenic organisms. The yeast saccharomyces has similar benefits to probiotic bacteria and has been shown to reduce lactate and acidity in grain-fed horses.

Research indicates horses who consume large amounts of grain can enjoy improved fiber digestion when also fed yeast probiotics.

Another yeast, aspergillus oryza (also well known as the source for many extremely beneficial digestive enzymes), is often given as a prebiotic and a probiotic. It actually produces lactic acid (the exact opposite of saccharomyces), and provides a source of food for many beneficial bacteria.

So, where does the farting come in?

When fungi die off, flatulence increases.  Many of us pay close attention to changes in flatulence as it can indicate a gas build up and need for concern in certain situations such as colic.  When we see scenarios where the fungi may have been compromised, we need to prioritize replacing the fungi and building up a new level of support.

What causes the fungi to die off?  There are many things that can disrupt the natural flora in the digestive tract.  Things like stress, shipping, feed changes, high sugar feeds, hormone imbalances, antibiotic treatments, and worming to name a few.

So how important is it to purchase a digestive supplement with a yeast component in it?  If you have a horse that stresses, had changes in bowel movement frequency/consistency, travels a lot, or has had incidences of colic, it can be extremely beneficial.

Be careful.  There are many feeds out there that use added yeast as a selling feature, but very rarely do you see any of them list actual levels of inclusion for the yeast.  Paying extra for this potential gimmick leaves many disappointed with the advertised results.  Using a supplement with a listed level of yeast additive is always the best way to ensure your horse has the help it may need to keep a happy digestive tract.

If you have questions on finding the right digestive supplement for your horse, contact us at www.thefigureseven.ca

 

Supplement Marketing – Buyer Beware

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The other day I had a few minutes while visiting a local equine supply store, so I thought I would browse the supplement isle.  It never hurts to see what everyone else is selling, find a few new products, and make sure our pricing is competitive.

On a large display along the back, I came across a fairly popular supplement line, and noticed they had some new labelling and a few names I hadn’t heard of yet.  Checking out the labels, I was quite impressed.  Now, had I been a regular customer looking for a good deal, I probably would have fell hook line and sinker for their pretty label claims on value for the product.

On the top of the 1 kg (1000g) pail I picked up – which ended up being a respiratory aid – it said “100 day supply” and “$0.57 per day!”

At first I thought Wow, great deal.  I need to check this out!

I turned to the side label which read:

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So, there is a 10g scoop enclosed.  If a horse was fed 1 scoop per day, this would indeed be a 100 day supply, and cost $0.57/day.  However, nowhere do I see a single scoop dosage in the feeding directions.

Assuming the average horse would be in the 1000lb range, we are talking 3 scoops per day.  Well that changes things!  Now this $57.00 pail becomes a 33 day supply, at $1.71 per day.

Only feeding an 850lb horse?  That makes it a 50 day supply for $1.14 per day.

Unfortunately, this deception was a common thread throughout the newer supplements in the same line.  Advertising that the container would last so many days, and cost x amount per day, but those figures didn’t coincide with the feeding directions on the side.

I suppose nothing is free of the dishonesty that comes with marketers trying to make a buck, so like everything else, it’s up to the consumer to be aware of what they are buying, check and double check.

Here at The Figure Seven, we inform our customers what the exact dosage is they are purchasing, and the exact price per day they pay for that dosage.  30 days lasts 30 days, no gimmicks, no false marketing.

To get your exact dose at a precise price, no hidden directions, visit us at The Figure Seven